IF AT FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED….. destroy all evidence you ever tried

Many of my clients are frustrated and discouraged about the state of our economy and their personal situations.  My family laughs that I am always a “glass half full person” and try to always find the light at the end of the tunnel.  So I thought today I would share some evidence of successful people throughout history that hit bottom just before soaring to the top.  It is always important to learn from your mistakes and failures only to use it to your advantage.  Instead of saying NEVER TRY, NEVER FAIL….. think about the success you might find after you fail…..

HENRY FORD (FORD MOTOR COMPANY):  Fords early businesses failed and left him broke five times before he founded the successful Ford Motor Company.

SOICHIRO HONDA (HONDA):  Honda was turned down by Toyota Motor Corporation for a job after interviewing for a job as an engineer, leaving him jobless for quite some time. He started making scooters of his own at home, and spurred on by his neighbors, finally started his own business.

AKIO MORITA (SONY):  Sony’s first product was a rice cooker that unfortunately didn’t cook rice, just burnt it, selling less than 100 units. This first setback didn’t stop Morita and his partners as they pushed forward to create a multi-billion dollar company.

BILL GATES (MICROSOFT):  Gates dropping out of Harvard and starting a failed first business with Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen called Traf-O-Data. While this early idea didn’t work, Gates’ later work did, creating the global empire that is Microsoft.

MICHAEL JORDAN:  Most people wouldn’t believe that a man often lauded as the best basketball player of all time was actually cut from his high school basketball team. Luckily, Jordan didn’t let this setback stop him from playing the game and he has stated, “I have missed more than 9,000 shots in my career. I have lost almost 300 games. On 26 occasions I have been entrusted to take the game winning shot, and I missed. I have failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed.”

BABE RUTH:  You probably know Babe Ruth because of his home run record (714 during his career), but along with all those home runs came a pretty hefty amount of strikeouts as well (1,330 in all). In fact, for decades he held the record for strikeouts. When asked about this he simply said, “Every strike brings me closer to the next home run.”

HARLAND DAVID SANDERS (COLENEL SANDERS):  Perhaps better known as Colonel Sanders of Kentucky Fried Chicken fame, Sanders had a hard time selling his chicken at first. In fact, his famous secret chicken recipe was rejected 1,009 times before a restaurant accepted it.

WALT DISNEY:  Disney was fired by a newspaper editor because, “he lacked imagination and had no good ideas.” After that, Disney started a number of businesses that didn’t last too long and ended with bankruptcy and failure. He kept plugging along, however, and eventually found a recipe for success that worked.

ALBERT EINSTEIN:  Most of us take Einstein’s name as synonymous with genius, but he didn’t always show such promise. Einstein did not speak until he was four and did not read until he was seven, causing his teachers and parents to think he was mentally handicapped, slow and anti-social. Eventually, he was expelled from school and was refused admittance to the Zurich Polytechnic School. It might have taken him a bit longer, but he caught on pretty well in the end, winning the Nobel Prize and changing the face of modern physics.

THOMAS EDISON:  In his early years, teachers told Edison he was “too stupid to learn anything.” Work was no better, as he was fired from his first two jobs for not being productive enough. Even as an inventor, Edison made 1,000 unsuccessful attempts at inventing the light bulb. Of course, all those unsuccessful attempts finally resulted in a design that worked.

FRED ASTAIRE:  In his first screen test, the testing director of MGM noted that Astaire, “Can’t act. Can’t sing. Slightly bald. Can dance a little.” Astaire went on to become an incredibly successful actor, singer and dancer and kept that note in his Beverly Hills home to remind him of where he came from.

SIDNEY POITIER:  After his first audition, Poitier was told by the casting director, “Why don’t you stop wasting people’s time and go out and become a dishwasher or something?” Poitier vowed to show him that he could make it, going on to win an Oscar and become one of the most well-regarded actors in the business.

THEODOR SEUSS GIESEL:  Today nearly every child has read The Cat in the Hat or Green Eggs and Ham, yet 27 different publishers rejected Dr. Seuss’s first book To Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street.

STEPHEN KING:  The first book by this author, the iconic thriller Carrie, received 30 rejections, finally causing King to give up and throw it in the trash. His wife fished it out and encouraged him to resubmit it, and the rest is history.

ELVIS PRESLEY:   But back in 1954, Elvis was still a nobody, and Jimmy Denny, manager of the Grand Ole Opry, fired Elvis Presley after just one performance telling him, “You ain’t goin’ nowhere, son. You ought to go back to drivin’ a truck.”

THE BEATLES:  When the Beatles were just starting out, a recording company told them no. They were told “we don’t like their sound, and guitar music is on the way out,” two things the rest of the world couldn’t have disagreed with more.

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5 responses to “IF AT FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED….. destroy all evidence you ever tried

  1. I loved this post Kari ! So true! All the history from all of those famous people just brings it home to try, try and try again.

    And remember when Steven Speilberg was turned down by M&m’s to use them iin his movie ET? But Reece’s pieces said yes to him, and it made them famous:)

    A failure is just a way of suggesting you try again:)

    Never give up when you believe in something – just try to make your action steps more effective along the way:)

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